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Showing posts from July, 2017

Driving Under the Influence of Speed

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Washington State drivers have a new “Driving Under the Influence of Electronics” law.

Keep your hands off your phone—don’t even read that text message at a stop light. We are limited to a single finger to “trigger a voice-activated application”.
Okay, I understand distraction, but how about reckless speeding?



A few weeks ago, I witnessed a near-miss collision and it had nothing to do a phone.



My rural highway leads to some spectacular camping spots. Tourists flock here every summer. Thirty foot motorhomes and trucks pulling huge trailers routinely drive slower than the speed limit.











Most of them are unfamiliar with our curvy highway. I was behind a car that was tailgating a truck and travel trailer.
But the slow-moving driver was almost going the speed limit—just a couple miles per hour under the limit.








Apparently, the tailgating driver was in a rush to get somewhere, so he attempted a foolish pass around the truck and trailer.
I slowed down and was far enough behind I could see an o…

Carrying the Burden

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I was one of fifty volunteers who carried a Fallen Hero banner in our local July 4th parade. As part of the Fallen Heroes Banner Project, these traveling banners are carried in parades and celebrations across America—honoring soldiers lost since 9/11. I held Army Sergeant Nathan Wyrick’s banner.
Once I got home I looked up his obituary online. He’d been sent to Iraq twice, and died in Afghanistan in 2011. 
He’d been a dutiful dad to his four young sons and was always helping others. He loved serving in kid’s ministry at New Hope Community Church. A close friend said, “He was a dad first and foremost, and a soldier second.” 
When military friends were deployed, Nathan acted as a dad for other families’ kids. His generous heart touched many.







That generous heart stopped beating when he was just thirty-four. I can only imagine the hole left in the hearts of his wife and sons. 
I carried his banner for less than two miles, they carry their loss for the remainder of their lives.











I was in awe as …